Veterinary Technician Associate Degree Program

Veterinary Technician Associate Degree Program

The program is fully accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities (CVTEA).

Graduates are prepared to take the Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE).

3 Years Pass Rate for Veterinary Technician Exam Total July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2016
Number of first-time candidates that have taken the VTNE 67
Number of eligible first-time candidates 67
Three-year Pass percentage on VTNE 90%

 

Animals are often considered a part of the family and people want good care for their family members. The Veterinary Technician Associate of Applied Science degree prepares students to work as part of a veterinary care team. Courses are taught by practicing veterinarians and registered veterinary technicians, providing students with relevant insight.

Program length – 24 months

 

 

 

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On-campus program

Healthcare curriculum for this program includes anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, microbiology, operating skills, surgical technology and surgical pharmacy. This program also includes general education courses to meet the requirements of an associate degree program including government, ethics, critical thinking, success strategies and written and oral communications. Prior to graduation, students complete an externship in a veterinary setting, providing real-world work experience. 

Upon completion, you could earn an Associate of Applied Science degree and be eligible to take the Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE).

The program is fully accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities (CVTEA).

Veterinary technicians have a variety of responsibilities. While they work with animals, they must also have good people skills. They educate clients on their pets’ health and nutrition, and explain the veterinarian’s instructions for care. Veterinary technicians perform medical tests under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian to help diagnose animals’ illnesses and injuries. Technicians may perform laboratory tests, such as a urinalysis, and help veterinarians conduct a variety of other diagnostic tests.

Graduates can work in private clinics, laboratories, animal hospitals, boarding kennels, animal shelters, rescue leagues, and even zoos.

Demand for veterinary technicians is expected to grow by more than 14%, faster than average, through 2024.1

1U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-2015 Edition, Job Outlook, retrieved 4/26/16

Rockford, Illinois